Customized Software Can Improve Your Business

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Technology is a very important concept to understand in the business world. It’s essential to know what your consumers are drawn to and what they aren’t. Here are a few ways that having customized data software can improve your business:

Problem Solving

Figuring out what works and what doesn’t is the first step toward improvement. Organized data helps businesses accomplish this, and can help startups grow and succeed. When something goes wrong, having good data can lead to exactly what the problem is quickly, reducing waste of time and money.

Decision Making

Decision making is obviously important for all companies but especially startups! One bad decision in a startup can actually cause immediate failure. Data can help find the exact target market early stage startups are looking for, while also predict sales trends and improve customer retention.

Monetization

Data is worth money! Companies can make BIG money selling data. Even when something is "free" to use, it actually is not free. Data is the currency to the offering company and that currency is very lucrative.

Having access to data software can be a really good asset to your business. There’s no better way to understand consumer trends, what’s working well, and where funding should be spent. Contact Goji Labs to see how we can help you develop software that can start making your data work for you!

Mobile App Data Can Help Build Customer Relationships

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Companies are getting pretty good at collecting and analyzing data via mobile apps. Rightfully so! Understanding your customers is key to growing your business. Let’s take a quick look at some ways data collecting via mobile apps can perpetuate growth.

Make good use of your collected data

Collecting mobile app data is one thing but organizing and interpreting that information and then implementing smart changes based on facts can be challenging. Fortunately, technology to help consolidate, analyze, understand, and interpret data is evolving as fast as our ability to collect information is expanding.

Determine how to maximize your profit

Establishing optimal pricing for a product or service is critical to business success. Examining your customer’s past purchasing history, product demand in the marketplace, and production costs, it’s possible to analyze all relevant factors and come up with pricing that maximizes profits. Also, data analysis can help determine what sort of markdown will move stock quickly at the best price and keep any losses to a minimum.

Keep pushing towards the future

Successful companies build on past successes when planning for the future. Smart budgeting effectively allocates resources to maximize returns. Smart modeling strategies predict the likely outcome of marketing campaigns. And smart data analysis allows you to put your efforts (and money) into campaigns most likely to maximize sales, exposure and/or client growth.

Strengthen business relationships with clients

There are few things more valuable than getting to know your customers well enough to generate customer loyalty. How well do you know your customers? Do you know your customer retention rates? How about lifetime value by customer? Knowing the answers to these questions is the first step to getting to know how successfully you are meeting your customer needs and expectations. With this information will you be able to improve customer experience and the effectiveness of marketing campaigns.

As you can see, smart use of big data is a win-win situation for all involved. Contact Goji Labs to learn more about how you can make your mobile app work for you!

How Non-Tech Founders Create MVP’s for Startups

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You don’t need to be a developer or a coder to succeed in creating a successful app and business idea. There are plenty of firms and agencies out there who can partner with you, to fill in those technological gaps.

But, before you dive in, there are some things you want to know. Your MVP is going to be the most important piece here, so you want to get this part right. Even though someone else is going to help you build it, you still need to know exactly how this process works, and what steps you need to take to be successful.

Here’s how to tackle creating your app’s MVP when you have no idea what you’re doing:

FULLY EMBRACE THE MVP PROCESS

At the beginning, building out the MVP should be your top priority. You may want to squeeze in time to create a pre-launch landing page and start building a waiting list, but we’ll touch on that later.

I could give you countless examples of wildly successful apps that were all bred from their MVP’s, but my favorite story is Uber. They’re the perfect example of the power of consumer demand. When the app was first created, it was only used by the founders and their friends in San Francisco. The small group of beta testers showed the founders what people wanted out of an app like this, and they were able to roll out a perfected product that subsequently raised over $11 billion in VC and private equity investment. Even better, they totally disrupted the transportation industry. It’s an epic story that all started with the MVP process.

The top benefits of investing in your MVP are:

  • You’ll get customer feedback right away. As soon as people start using your minimum viable product, you’ll learn what works, what doesn’t, and what they want from your app.

  • It speeds up the product building phase. Knowing what users want before reaching this stage will make it easier, faster, cheaper, and better.

  • You will lower the chance of risk. Rather than building expensive features, you’ll wait to ensure people are demanding them. You won’t build the extras until you’ve gotten validation from your users.

Here’s how you want to approach building your MVP:

  • Define your why, and figure out what problems your app is going to solve. Who is your target audience, and why should they care? What makes you better and different from their other options?

  • Create a customer avatar and use it to create stories around them using your app. This might sound silly, but it’s one of the best ways to decide on what features to start with. How will people use your app in their daily lives? Assign your desired features with a “must have”, “should have”, and “can have” category. The “must have” category is the perfect place to start with your MVP. The other features can be added later, once you’re sure people want them.

  • Start to build a community around your business idea and concept. Create a landing page once your idea is clear, and start building a waiting list for your launch. Get involved in other online communities where you target audience hangs out. Start blogging and creating content around what problems you solve, and what differentiates your business. This is called the pre-launch stage and should be started as early as possible. It’s a great way to test market demand and interest as well.

Once you’ve worked through these steps, it’s time to find the right partner to bring your idea to life. You’ve done the groundwork to fully understand your concept, your idea, and what features your MVP needs. Now, you have what you need to find the right firm or agency to make this happen.

How To Make The Most Out Of Your MVP

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If you’re looking to build an app, you’ve already been told a thousand times you need to start with a great MVP. You want to test the idea first, before you invest and potentially lose a whole bunch of money on a bad idea.

When going through the minimum viable product process, there are some definite best practices you want to be aware of. These tips and strategies will help you to get the most out of your MVP and startup business idea.

DON’T START WITH A FINAL PRODUCT IN MIND

This might sound completely backward, but hear me out. The point of the MVP process is to test an idea. You want to invest only what you have to, to create a product that users can test. The point of this is to use their feedback to design the end product.

But if you already have an end product in mind, what’s the point? The best apps have come from user-driven data. People tell companies what they need and want out of their apps, and the successful ones listen. So let your customers be in the driver’s seat and point your app in the right direction.

Ensure that when you create your MVP, you’re building in areas that will help you capture user behavior. You want to know what people are doing, where they are spending their time, and much more. As soon as you gain some understanding on how consumers want to be able to use your app, make a hard shift to set that in motion.

THE CHEAP COMES OUT EXPENSIVE

There are many, many mistakes you can make along the way that will do nothing more than cost you time and money. The point of building a MVP is to save money, not waste it.

In this section, there are plenty of items to consider:

  • Make sure you have the initial capital to complete your project from start to finish. Don’t jump in and start without funds to finish.
  • Avoid a fixed price development model when you can. It may seem like a good idea to control your budget, but it can sometimes turn into a nightmare. Your best bet is to hire someone hourly, who is going to be in the trenches with you from start to finish.
  • Consult a business analyst if you’re not heavily involved in this market already. The developer can build your app, but won’t be able to give you critical insight into things like industry-specific requirements and features for an app.
  • Don’t ignore the power and importance of mobile. Some startups make the mistake of building their app specifically for desktops first, just to get something out the door. The reality is that the majority of your customers will want a mobile app. You need to give people what they want, or they won’t use your app.
  • Don’t build expensive features until your customers have told you it’s what they want. Resist the urge to look more established than what you really are and let your customers tell you want they want before you spend more money.
  • Don’t skimp on good automation and architecture that will provide the foundation you need for scalability down the road. This is one area where you need to think big from the onset.
  • Unless you have an experienced internal development team, trying to build the app yourself won’t save you money or time. Finding the right firm or partner to help bring your design to life will almost always save you money in the long run.

To recap, here are the most important things. Let the customers drive the end-product design, and don’t make the common mistakes mentioned above that waste your hard-earned or raised money. Making the most of your MVP will set your business up for a successful future.

How Many Different Ways Can You Test Your MVP?

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We spend a lot of time talking about MVP’s around here, and that’s because we feel so strongly about their importance. Diving into developing an app without doing your homework first (getting feedback from your ideal customers) just doesn’t make good business sense. So many companies do it, and we get why. You have a burning idea and you’re certain that it’s so incredible, someone else will do it first if you don’t hurry. The reality is, this does happen - but it’s still not a good enough reason to skip due process and do things the smart way.

The main goal of any minimum viable product is to test. You want to test your business idea, test your product, and test your features. You want to test every aspect of your business idea to ensure there is a demand. Are people willing to pay for what you’re making? Does anyone even need this? And once you’ve rolled out the product, what features do people want? What can you do to provide the best possible user experience?

Let’s dive into some solid ways you can test your MVP to get the most out of this process.

  • Create a landing page for your product. Use this to capture the email addresses of people who want to be notified when you launch, but don’t stop there. Use this page to market your product and test demand. Use it to gauge demand for things like preferred features and pricing. This page can be the first step in figuring out what people want from you. You can even allow people to pre-order here.

  • Use A/B testing to explore variations of your MVP. With your beta users, have them go through different experiences with your app or marketing to record which performs better.

  • Run ad tests with your landing page, and also incorporate A/B testing here too. You can see what features attract the most engagement, and test different marketing messages as well. If you have 5 main “must have” features, which ones are being searched for the most?

  • Take the time to conduct customer interviews. Ask your users what they thought, what they liked, what they hated, and what they expected.

  • Start crowdfunding now. You might be surprised to find that the crowdfunding sites are mostly products in the MVP stage, looking to create a buzz and get funding from users. If people get excited about your product, it’s validation. If not, you may need to change something.

  • Start creating content around your idea, and the problems your product solves. Start a blog, create videos, and find online communities where your target audience lurks. Are people interested in what you’re talking about? Can you build a community around your idea?

One of the most important things to get here is what when building out your MVP, you only want to start with your core “must have” features. These core features and design elements are what you’re testing. This leaves room to incorporate your feedback into the final design.

Don’t skip this step and invest in features or design elements that your users don’t want. Do the minimum work possible to get your idea out the door and into the hands of the users, and then stretch that testing opportunity as far as you can. Take full advantage of the insight people are willing to give you, and use that as the driver to create the perfect product.

Expert Tips For Building Mobile Apps From Startup Founders

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If you’re a startup dreaming about building the next big app, you’re amongst the masses in today’s competitive landscape. But in spite of this competition, countless startups are successful in building their apps into well-known brands that make big bucks.

With nearly 8 million apps in the Google Play store alone, how does a company stand out? The reality is that even though we’re all downloading apps like crazy, we only use 9 of them on a daily basis. Over the course of the month, the average person will use 30 different apps.

How does a company make the cut? How can you be better, faster, and give people what they need and want in their daily lives?

For this question, we’re going straight to the source. Here are the outlined steps that have come straight from the mouths of founders from thriving startups. This is how they all went from nothing to growing app businesses.

Start with a plan

Don’t just dive in without doing your research and understanding the core components that will take your project from start to finish. You need to start with a plan, and here is how you do it.

  • Do your market research: don’t make assumptions. Take the time to research the market, the competition, and the current trends and landscape. In addition to this, you need to test your app idea. This is a great time to develop your MVP, so your ideal client base can experience your app, and provide invaluable feedback on features and design before you build the final product.

  • Pick a target group: this will come from your market research. Decide who your ideal customers are, so you can tailor your features, marketing, and messaging accordingly.

  • Pre-plan the app’s design: get everything you need to happen on paper, so that any random person looking at the design specs could understand what you want. Define what you want the app to do and outline the flow you’re expecting to see. Clarify what people or firms will handle each of the steps throughout the entire process.

  • Prioritize the user experience: start with your user experience designer first to create a prototype, before you have a developer building the end product. Allow users to test your app for user experience, to ensure you’ve nailed that first and foremost. If you don’t give people a good user experience, your app will never survive.

  • Don’t skip the MVP process: it’s already been mentioned, but this is an important step that should not be skipped. Start with the minimum viable product that gives people something to test, and build out from there. Get feedback on user experience, features, and design long before anything is finalized.

  • Be prepared for continued investment: once your app is done, or even throughout the MVP stages, you’ll continue to invest money for updates and tweaks. This is a never-ending process, so be prepared for the continual investment if you want your app to perform optimally as time goes on.

  • Don’t forget about your marketing strategy: developing and building your app is one piece of the pie, but this thing isn’t going to sell itself. Think about your short-term and long-term marketing strategy, and don’t wait until your product is finalized to start. You can start on a pre-launch as soon as the idea is conceptualized with a basic landing page and waiting list.

These tips, strategies, and processes have been coined from those who have already done this. If you want to become an expert, the best place to start is learning from those who have already travelled your path.

Happy building!

The 3 Big Myths Startups Believe When Building for Mobile

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Most startups, tech or otherwise, are feeling the urgency to go mobile in a big way. And, it’s no secret as to why. Once a seemingly trendy thing that many big businesses attempted to ignore, mobile development is at the forefront of today’s next big things.

A few fun facts about mobile you may not have heard yet:

Google drives 95% of all US paid search ad clicks on mobile Users spend on average 69% of their media time on smartphones Mobile devices will soon drive 80% of global internet usage 78% of mobile searches for local business information result in a purchase - that’s higher than from any other kind of device Mobile-influenced offline spending is already over $1 trillion - people do heavy mobile research before indulging in offline purchasing

These stats are just confirmation that mobile has become completely ingrained in our society, and a part of our daily lives. Many startups are capitalizing on app development in a big way, but there are definitely a few of them missing the mark.

If you want to make sure you don’t waste your time and money when developing your next app, take a read through these common mobile myths so you can avoid making these mistakes.

Mistake #1

Building apps natively (per platform) is worth your time and money - trust me. Many companies try to skip over this, and think the extra coding won’t pay off. Big companies like Facebook and LinkedIn have made this mistake in the past. If you want a five-star app, you’ve got to take the extra time to build by platform. Start with your most popular platform first, and go from there. Otherwise, you’re just going to create a poor user experience.

Mistake #2

Don’t assume your existing backend infrastructure will be able to support mobile development. What if your traffic suddenly increased by 300%? It happens to companies all the time. The reality is that you will likely need to update (or possibly rebuild) your backend to support developing a mobile app. If you want your app to perform well, you need the right API design and implementation - no exceptions.

Mistake #3

Building your app internally is obviously the way to go. It will cost less, and happen faster. Right? Wrong. Unless you have a dedicated and experienced mobile building team, it’s extremely unlikely that using your own team to build your app will be faster and cheaper than hiring a firm who specializes in app development. The most likely scenario is that it will take longer, cost more, and not be as good. If you don’t have a solid team in place internally, do your research before making this hard decision.

You’ll also want to consider things like how much work will be required on your end, when you do hire a firm. What are their expectations of your involvement? This is more like a partnership than anything, so don’t assume that just because you’re hiring help means you won’t have to do any work. And, although it’s a partnership, it’s not a marriage. Just because you hired a company to build your app doesn’t mean you’re stuck with them forever or that they have some kind of proprietary ownership over your software and data. The best companies will actually set your business up to have the ability to build their own apps in the future, if that’s the path you want to take.

So there you have it. Those are some of the biggest mistakes you want to avoid when deciding to develop your own mobile app!

How To Rock Your App Pre-Launch

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If you’ve developed and launched an app before, you’ve already learned the lesson that there is PLENTY of work to be done before you ever come close to making your official launch.

If you want to have a successful launch, the work you do beforehand will be just as important. Here is a rock-solid strategy to set your app up for success:

CREATE AND DEFINE YOUR CUSTOMER AVATARS

Everything you do needs to be tailored to your ideal audience, so this is a crucial step you don’t want to skip. Who is your ideal customer? You may have several segments of your business, and you might find there are a few buyer personas for each aspect of your business.

Spend the time upfront to decide who these people are, and try to build an understanding and awareness of what they want and need from your business, and your app. This is the only way you can be truly relevant, and this will come into play with marketing, community building, and more.

CHECK OUT YOUR COMPETITION

Pay attention to what others in your space are doing. Who are their customers? Which apps are the most popular and why? How are they marketing and community building? What do their customer reviews say, and are there gaps you could be filling? NAILDOWN YOUR CORE MARKETING PIECES

While your marketing will eventually become a fluid and moving strategy, there are some core elements you need to iron out at the very beginning. Don’t wait until you’re ready to publish your website to decide on things like brand colors and a business name.

Key items you want to finalize before putting yourself out there are: Your app name and business name Keywords you want to be found for A press kit A product demo Branding

BUILD A WEBSITE OR LANDING PAGE

Now that you’ve created your buyer personas, decided on some crucial marketing elements and crept the competition, it’s time to create yourself a basic website or landing page. This is where you want to drive anyone who’s interested in being an early adopter, and start collecting email addresses for your big launch day. Without a landing page, it’s nearly impossible to start building an audience for your app.

GET ON PREAPPS

Preapps is an excellent place to gain the attention of early adopters and potential beta testers. It’s one of several communities for app developers to gauge interest in their developments and grow your email list. Before you register, you’ll want to have the basic marketing elements finalized and also your app icon and screenshots.

FIND YOUR TRIBE

Use your buyer persona as a starting point to find out where your people hang out. Maybe it’s Reddit, maybe it’s LinkedIn. Start creating content and trying it in new places, to start finding and building your tribe.

DECIDE ON YOUR RELEASE DATE

Your release date is pretty important, and here’s why. What if you pick a date that is months down the road, and the day before you realize that Apple or Google are also launching something huge that day? Don’t just pick a date - research it. Make sure you’re not going to drown in someone else’s noise on your big day.

CREATE A CONTENT MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY

If you want to win the long-game, you are going to need a content marketing strategy. If you want people to find you, and come to you, it starts with a solid content marketing strategy and plan.

You’ve already started on this, whether you realize it or not. You’ve got your buyer persona, marketing elements, and a landing page or website. You’ve already tested out some content, to see where your tribe might be lurking. Use this foundation as the starting point to create and launch a solid content marketing and social media strategy that will attract your ideal customers.

KEEP ALL YOUR HARD WORK GOING

You’ve been going full-speed up until your launch date, but that doesn’t mean it’s time to relax. Keep going. Keep executing on your strategies, to keep driving business to your website. Communicate regularly with the email list you’re building, and with the social communities you worked so hard to create. Keep the buzz going throughout the entire pre-launch and launch stage, and continue to build relationships with your audience as a regular part of your business activities.

If you want to rock your pre-launch and be ready to nail it on your big day, follow the strategy outlined above. Good luck!

Some Business Ideas For Your Next Great App Development

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So you’re ready to get into another startup and you want to develop the next big app - but, you’re short on ideas. Well today is your lucky day.

Here are some solid industries and business ideas where apps are in demand and making waves.

Taxing & Invoicing

Taxes and accounting are something that every single business, big and small, has to deal with. Every business out there is on the hunt for a program that’s easier, cheaper, and takes less of their time.

Local Food & Grocery Delivery & Pick-up

This is something growing across many industries, including restaurants, fast food chains, and even grocers. We are a busy society, and many of today’s consumers would rather pay to have their goods delivered than take the time to collect it themselves. Or, people now want to order online ahead, and simply pick-up their order upon arrival.

Health & Fitness

There are countless health and fitness apps and devices out there, but there is still plenty of room for improvement. People want programs that can track their workouts, help them monitor their eating, and even remind them of their next doctor’s appointment.

Gifts For Special Occasions

Whether it’s Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day or a birthday, many consumers struggle with keeping up. What if there was an app that helped people stay on top of every holiday, and helped them arrange a purchase with practically zero effort after the initial set-up?

Dating Sites

Online dating is a norm in today’s society, and online daters are always looking for the next best thing. There’s plenty of opportunity for apps that offer more, like connecting with social networks and allowing friends and family to either approve or disapprove. There could be 1st, 2nd and third date suggestions, along with tracking for success or failure. There are niches that haven’t been touched, and this is a growing market.

Travel & Tourism

Apps that help people travel better and for less will continue to be in high demand. It’s not easy to know all the cool local spots when you’re a foreigner, but wouldn’t it be cool if you landed somewhere and an app on your phone suddenly had all the local suggestions at your fingertips?

Cooking

People want to eat better and healthier, but they also want to waste less and find recipes that are fast and easy. Helping people create great meals with the food already in their kitchen is a great starting point for this budding industry. What other ideas or services could you add onto this to stand out from the competition?

Site Security

While maintaining site security is crucial for countless businesses out there, there is also a demand for convenience. A business owner or security guard should have the option to manage and monitor everything on their device, regardless of where they are.

Cloud Collaboration

With the rise of remote work and freelancers, it’s more important than ever that businesses have the right tools and apps to help their teams work as a cohesive unit. Apps that help manage projects and teams are in high-demand, and businesses continue to seek out optimal solutions that meet their unique set of needs. Industry specific apps can have a major advantage over generalized solutions.

Well, there you have it! I hope this list has given you some inspiration on a starting point for a solid business app idea. Most of these have already been done, but there is a never-ending demand for something that’s better, faster, and has new and improved features.

How To Rock Your App Pre-Launch

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If you’ve developed and launched an app before, you’ve already learned the lesson that there is PLENTY of work to be done before you ever come close to making your official launch.

If you want to have a successful launch, the work you do beforehand will be just as important. Here is a rock-solid strategy to set your app up for success:

CREATE AND DEFINE YOUR CUSTOMER AVATARS

Everything you do needs to be tailored to your ideal audience, so this is a crucial step you don’t want to skip. Who is your ideal customer? You may have several segments of your business, and you might find there are a few buyer personas for each aspect of your business.

Spend the time upfront to decide who these people are, and try to build an understanding and awareness of what they want and need from your business, and your app. This is the only way you can be truly relevant, and this will come into play with marketing, community building, and more.

CHECK OUT YOUR COMPETITION

Pay attention to what others in your space are doing. Who are their customers? Which apps are the most popular and why? How are they marketing and community building? What do their customer reviews say, and are there gaps you could be filling? NAILDOWN YOUR CORE MARKETING PIECES

While your marketing will eventually become a fluid and moving strategy, there are some core elements you need to iron out at the very beginning. Don’t wait until you’re ready to publish your website to decide on things like brand colors and a business name.

Key items you want to finalize before putting yourself out there are: Your app name and business name Keywords you want to be found for A press kit A product demo Branding

BUILD A WEBSITE OR LANDING PAGE

Now that you’ve created your buyer personas, decided on some crucial marketing elements and crept the competition, it’s time to create yourself a basic website or landing page. This is where you want to drive anyone who’s interested in being an early adopter, and start collecting email addresses for your big launch day. Without a landing page, it’s nearly impossible to start building an audience for your app.

GET ON PREAPPS

Preapps is an excellent place to gain the attention of early adopters and potential beta testers. It’s one of several communities for app developers to gauge interest in their developments and grow your email list. Before you register, you’ll want to have the basic marketing elements finalized and also your app icon and screenshots.

FIND YOUR TRIBE

Use your buyer persona as a starting point to find out where your people hang out. Maybe it’s Reddit, maybe it’s LinkedIn. Start creating content and trying it in new places, to start finding and building your tribe.

DECIDE ON YOUR RELEASE DATE

Your release date is pretty important, and here’s why. What if you pick a date that is months down the road, and the day before you realize that Apple or Google are also launching something huge that day? Don’t just pick a date - research it. Make sure you’re not going to drown in someone else’s noise on your big day.

CREATE A CONTENT MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY

If you want to win the long-game, you are going to need a content marketing strategy. If you want people to find you, and come to you, it starts with a solid content marketing strategy and plan.

You’ve already started on this, whether you realize it or not. You’ve got your buyer persona, marketing elements, and a landing page or website. You’ve already tested out some content, to see where your tribe might be lurking. Use this foundation as the starting point to create and launch a solid content marketing and social media strategy that will attract your ideal customers.

KEEP ALL YOUR HARD WORK GOING

You’ve been going full-speed up until your launch date, but that doesn’t mean it’s time to relax. Keep going. Keep executing on your strategies, to keep driving business to your website. Communicate regularly with the email list you’re building, and with the social communities you worked so hard to create. Keep the buzz going throughout the entire pre-launch and launch stage, and continue to build relationships with your audience as a regular part of your business activities.

If you want to rock your pre-launch and be ready to nail it on your big day, follow the strategy outlined above. Good luck!

Want To Provide A Better User Experience? Start With The Data

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Designers and data analysts come from two different worlds.

A designer is defined as someone who plans the form, look, or workings of something, before it is made or built. Conversely, a data analyst is described as a person who takes large volumes of data and numbers, and has the ability to transform that data into something valuable that supports decision-making and helps to provide information, context, and direction.

Although these two professions are profoundly different, there is an area where they have the ability to work beautifully together - and that space is called user experience (UX).

Designers have an intuitive knack for developing and designing apps and websites that provide a phenomenal UX. They know what people want, and how to give it to them. Some of it is learned over time through experience, but some of it comes naturally to talented people. But, that innate sense can only take a product so far.

How can we continue to improve on already great products? How can we take an existing app and make it better? The answer is in the data.

Data & User Experience Working Together

User experience is all about creating the most engaging and immersive experience possible. It’s about sucking people in, and ensuring they want to come back again and again. But when you want to reach this heightened level of UX, how do you get there? You can test theories and hypotheses, and adjust accordingly. You can run different A/B tests every week, and then make changes based on your results.

But the problem with this approach is that when you’re the one creating the alternatives and the variables, you’re only testing against things you already know. Because you don’t know what you don’t know, it’s impossible to truly be open to all possibilities when you’re relying on your team’s ability to come up with new variables and scenarios to test.

This is where the data comes in. Instead of making up your own theories to test, you want to collect user data and allow that to tell you what needs to happen.

Think about how much more accurate and powerful the data is, when it’s originated by the users themselves. Every click your users take can be captured, tracked and analyzed. Where do they spend most of their time? What pages do they return to, over and over? What is their purchasing history?

When you start collecting, tracking, and analyzing every aspect of your user’s activity within your app, you have officially entered the realm of the big data world.

Recent studies have shown that an individual’s time spent in mobile apps versus mobile web browsers is now 7:1, and that gap will likely continue to grow. If you want people to choose to spend their precious time and energy in your app, you’ve got to do the work to keep them there.

But, the reality is that no one knows better what the consumers want than the actual consumers. We can create buyer personas and run focus groups until we’re blue in the face, but that data will never be as accurate as what consumer behaviour tells us. Let your consumers lead the way, and they’ll show you how to provide them with the UX they want.

So rather than relying on your team’s instincts, rely on the data your consumers are sending you. Don’t guess what they want - let them tell you through their own actions.

Tactics To Get Your App Noticed Before You Even Launch

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If you want your new app to get noticed, you’re going to have to hustle - hard. In March of this year, the Google Play store alone reported having over 3 million apps available for sale. If you want to have a shot at pushing through all that noise and gaining any traction, you’re going to need a plan.

In addition to having a solid pre-launch plan to start, there are a few extra things you can be doing to increase your chances of success. Here are a few things you can try, in addition to what you’re hopefully already doing.

MAKE YOUR APP AVAILABLE ABSOLUTELY EVERYWHERE

Don’t just focus on the app store - you need to think about where any potential customers could be searching for what you offer. More than likely, they’re looking online for a solution to their problems and not your app whatsoever.

Google recently confirmed what we all suspected, that consumers are now finding apps via their search engine queries, and not going straight to the source. Forty percent of people are still finding apps in their app store of preference, but that means that the rest are finding them through their online searches.

You want to ensure you’re considering everywhere people may search for solutions to their problems. For example, let’s say your app is the next best thing for small business accounting. Because you’ve worked through the process of planning a solid pre-launch strategy, you already have several buyer personas and your keywords nailed down. You want to be found when business owners search for things like “cheapest small business accounting software” and “easiest accounting software for entrepreneurs”.

On Google, you can consider both search engine optimization and paid ads. When people are actively searching for solutions that you offer, you want to ensure your app is found. People may search on YouTube, so consider creating videos about your app and what problems it solves. You can also start a blog or a podcast that is jam-packed with content that is tailored to meet the needs of your ideal customers. You can search forums, Facebook groups, and countless online communities where you think your target clients spend their time.

The goal here is to be as accessible as possible, and remember that a huge amount of people will never use the app store as a search tool. You want to be found in the places where they are searching for solutions to their problems.

MAXIMIZE YOUR ASO

Your app store optimization (ASO) is hugely important. Once you’ve managed to get people here, it will either make or break the deal. They’ll either love what they see and make the download, or your efforts to get them there will have been wasted.

There are some key things you want to do to ensure your store is maximized:

  • Your app’s name should be short - ideally, less than 25 characters
  • Your main keyword should be in your name
  • Aim for a balanced mix of your own unique branding and keywords in the name
  • Use the first 3 sentences of your brief description to highlight the main advantages of your app, and be sure to clarify the problems that your app solves
  • In your full description, mention what’s new and report changes and updates to your users
  • Try to identify the top keywords that will drive users to your app, and use those keywords in your description
  • People will make decisions based on your app’s icon alone, so be sure you’ve taken the time to properly research this before just slapping something together
  • You want to have the best possible screenshots of your app being used
  • Use engaging screenshots for your images, and ensure you clearly show users how to do everything

This is just a snippet all of all the different things you can do to get your app to stand out, but it’s a great place to start. Remember that people are looking everywhere, and the app store is the final stop.

Ecommerce Best Practices: Tips to Improve Your Sales

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If you’re selling something online, your ecommerce website is where all the action needs to happen. Whether you’re in the initial design and launch stage, or looking to increase your sales, there are some crucial elements of the overall design that will have a massive impact on your bottom line.

Today’s consumers have pretty high expectations of the business they choose to give their hard-earned money too. In almost every industry out there, competition is stiff. If you want users to stay on your site, buy from you, and come back to your site over and over, you’ve got to be giving them a fantastic user experience.

Creating a positive user experience isn’t easy, and there are many variables to consider. From the images you use to your ease of facilitating a transaction, there’s lots to think about if you want those customers to keep coming back.

Here are some tips to help you increase sales on your ecommerce website:

YOU NEED EYE-CATCHING & APPEALING PHOTOS

Regardless of what you’re selling, your images matter. So much of what we absorb online today is visual, and that isn’t going to change anytime soon. Consumers are attracted to things that grab their attention, so make sure your images are going to get noticed. Your product images are hugely important to whether or not someone will make a purchase.

Some surveys have shown that more than 65% of online shoppers say that great product images are more effective than product reviews or information when making a purchase decision. That’s pretty powerful stuff!

ANSWER QUESTIONS & COMBAT OBJECTIONS THROUGH PRODUCT DEMOS

Whether you’re selling an app or a purse, having a product demo that both answers questions and combats objections is an extremely powerful sales tool. Demos show consumers what your product will do. If you want them to buy it, this is obviously an effective way to show them that your product is the solution to their problem.

But why stop there? Take it a step further and get creative with ways you can use the demo feature to combat the potential objections you’re used to dealing with. Similar to handling objections on a landing page before they’re even asked, you can do this through your product demo too. Think about what questions and objections your sales team hears the most, and find a way to build those into your product demo.

MAKE NAVIGATION REALLY, REALLY EASY

While you always want your homepage to look crisp and clean, don’t do it at the expense of your user experience. When someone winds up on a certain page, make sure they can easily trace back their steps to get where the came from. Setting up these “breadcrumbs” will ensure people can go back to anything that piqued their interest, and not feel frustrated if they wind up on the wrong page because of one misplaced click.

Use your navigation bar and possible filters to their full extent. Using an extended navigation bar still looks clean, but allows for a slew of options not possible with smaller formats. This makes it significantly easier for people to find exactly what they’re looking for, and more likely they’ll stick around.

Use filters to help people pick through things like features, sizes, price ranges, designers, manufacturers, and more. Make it as easily as possible for people to quickly find what they’re looking for. Consumers expect finding what they want to be easy, so you need to remove as many barriers as possible through your ecommerce platform.

USE PERSONALIZATION EVERYWHERE YOU CAN

Amazon and Netflix both do a really great job of this in different ways. If you’re a Netflix subscriber, many of the shows you watch have likely come from the emails and suggestions Netflix has made, based on your past viewer history. Take advantage of any opportunity to make meaningful, personalized suggestions to your shoppers. It will engage them, and continue to drive value by showing them you’ve got plenty more to offer.

Those are just a few of the many things you can do to make your user experience on your ecommerce site that much better. If you want people to shop and keep coming back, you’ve got to keep working on optimizing their overall experience.

How To Get From Your MVP To A Thriving Business

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Although many people treat it as such, the concept of a minimum viable product (MVP) is NOT just just a buzzword or trend. If you want to save money and build a better product while staying lean, it’s an absolute essential to get right.

This lean startup culture lingo is often tied back to The Lean Startup by Eric Ries, who introduced this concept to the masses in his 2011 best-selling business book. The MVP was just one of the concepts he spoke about, and since then, it’s become a major foundational element to countless startups.

What exactly is a minimum viable product?

This is one of those things that sounds much more complicated than it actually is. The basic gist behind creating a MVP is that you create something usable to test a business idea. Before investing large sums of money or finalizing your product, you create a beta version that your users can test, and help you finalize.

The point is to put in as little work as possible, to get your business or product to a place where customers can use it, validate it, and make suggestions on what would improve it. You get to confirm there is a demand, and get valuable feedback and insight from your potential customers on what they want and need out of your product and service.

Once you’ve gotten validation and customer insight, it’s time to invest and finalize your product. Making any major investments before testing in this manner is in contraction to the proven methodology of the lean startup, and really just an unnecessary risk in today’s digital landscape. This model can be applied to every single business out there, not just technology-based businesses.

Let’s go through a really simple example that would apply to almost every entrepreneur out there, and see how we can use the MVP model to test an idea before investing a bunch of time and money.

The concept? You want to sell something. Anything. Let’s pretend it’s an eBook or brand new app.

MVP: you’re going to see if there’s any interest around what you’re offering before you create it.

How to do it? You’re going to spend the weekend building yourself a 3-page website. Use one of the many builders out there and pay a few dollars for a domain but don’t bother buying a fancy template just yet.

Your website needs 3 pages:

Sales page: this is to market your product or service About me page: tell people about you, your business, and provide contact information Lead-capture page: this is where you collect people’s emails for when the product or service is ready, or you pre-sell now

Next, you’re going to drive some traffic to your page and see if there’s any market demand for what you’re offering. You haven’t created it yet, but that doesn’t matter. Whether you invest in Facebook ads or start making cold calls, just get people to that page.

If your business idea starts to generate sales or a waiting list, you’re beginning to validate your idea. Only now does it make sense to invest in creating. If you’re not getting any solid results, it’s time to rethink your business plan or start tweaking your sales copy. You don’t invest in your business idea until the market is telling you it’s what they want.

This is a simple and almost stupid example, but it’s a process that so many people skip over. They spend 2 months of their time creating that eBook, and then no one wants it. They create an app that no one downloads. You can apply the MVP model to any business - it’s the absolute best way to save money and increase revenue.

Should I Hire A Company Or Freelancer To Design My App?

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If you’re not a programmer, you’re going to have to outsource the development of your app to a team. Hiring the right people is absolutely essential if you want a viable, profitable product, so it’s not a decision to be made hastily.

For most startups, the easy part of the decision is to outsource. Hiring a team of employees just isn’t possible based on budgetary constraints alone, not to mention things like office space, training, and hardware.

But even with the decision to outsource, there are still many variables you need to consider and address. One of the biggest obstacles is the decision on whether to hire freelancers, or use a software company.

Let’s look at some pros and cons of both options.

HIRING A FREELANCER

Choosing to use one or several freelancers can be a good option when cost is a major concern. You can gain access to freelancers from around the globe with the lowest rates, and you don’t have to incur any costs aside from the actual project. If you only have a one-time need, this can be a great option.

But, there are some definite drawbacks. If you choose to use a single and remote individual, you give up a huge element of control. It’s difficult to truly understand their experience, and you can also encounter language barriers as well as time zone issues. There’s always a risk of the individual vanishing, or not completing your project on time or within budget. There are plenty of great freelancers out there, but there are unfortunately some bad ones as well.

HIRING A COMPANY

As with a freelancer, there are some definite pros and cons of choosing to hire a software company. You can access software companies from around the globe, but you can also find one in your neighborhood. Companies have a few major upsides, which include constant skill development and scaling to meet project demands. You’re not relying on one person to complete the work - you’ve got an entire team partnering with you. In this atmosphere, it’s more likely that deadlines will be met and that you’ll get the end result you need. Many people assume that hiring a software company will be more expensive than hiring a freelancer, but it’s often not the case.

If you choose to hire a company that isn’t local, you want to ensure things like time zones and language barriers. As with a freelancer, these seemingly small things can become a major problem if you’re not aware of them beforehand. Get confirmation the software companies you’re researching have ample time and resources for your project, and ask about the employee attrition rate. Some companies have a reputation for taking on too much work, or have a revolving door of employees. This can slow down your project, so these are questions you should ask.

Whether you choose to hire and freelancer or a software company to design your app, here are a few basic questions you should ask every single candidate:

Do you have a portfolio I can see? What are your past experiences and current skills? Can you provide me with a list of references to contact? What was the biggest problem you encountered during a project, and how did you solve it? What is your current tech stack, and what new technologies are next on your list? What is the process going to be? How will we communicate?

The success of your app development starts with you, but it will finish with the team of people you hire. If you want to ensure your design is in the best possible hands, make sure you explore all your options and carefully consider what elements are most important to you.

The Future of Connected Software & Infotainment in Cars

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If you haven’t heard of car infotainment before, you’re not alone. But, chances are, you’ve been enjoying it for years without hearing the industry jargon. As the name would imply, your infotainment system is your car’s technology that encompases your entire information and entertainment system. Once upon a time, that screen was primarily used to monitor your fuel consumption and direct you to your favorite radio stations.

Today, your car can become a complete information and entertainment system without having to do anything whatsoever. With the newest technologies rolling out, the tech giants have got you covered.

We’re going to take a look at the two main infotainment softwares for cars today, which are Android Auto and CarPlay.

Both programs allow the drivers to connect and integrate their smartphone into their vehicle’s infotainment system. Once connected, the screen on your car becomes a secondary screen of what’s on your phone, which then allows use of some apps on your phone via the car’s screen. This can include messaging apps, navigation, music, and more.

Newer model cars are being built to support these newer technologies and come with options for steering wheel controls and voice-commands, to facilitate hands-free driving. And, chances are that if your car supports one of these applications it will support the other, so you don’t need to worry about what type of phone you have when making that next vehicle purchase.

Let’s take a closer look at both.

Android Auto by Google

If you’re on an Android, you’re going to use the Android Auto mobile app to take advantage of your car’s infotainment system. The app debuted in 2014, and was released for use in 2015. You can use touchscreen, button control, or voice commands to use your interface once your phone is connected.

Because this is a Google device, your navigation system will default to Google Maps. You’ve got countless options for music, including Amazon, Google, Spotify, and more. You can even use Facebook Messenger and Skype, and catch your latest podcasts.

CarPlay by Apple

If you’ve got an iPhone 5 or something newer, chances are you’re already using CarPlay every time you hop into your car. You operate it the same way as you would the Android Auto, but you’ve got some more choices with your apps that sync.

Most vehicle manufacturers say they have plans to incorporate this software to their new vehicles in the near future, and you can even retrofit older cars with an aftermarket vehicle audio hardware. All of the major vehicle manufacturers have already partnered with Apple on this, according to their website.

Through this app, your car’s infotainment system can access countless apps, such as Siri, Audible, Apple Maps, Spotify, iMessage, and many more.

These apps are in direct competition with one another, but regardless of which one you’re using, they both appear pretty consistent with their user friendly interfaces and options.

What does the future hold for software in cars?

The only surprising thing about all of this is how long it took for these apps to become mainstream, and for consumers to even be aware of them. But now that large volumes of consumers are purchasing their new vehicles with this software ready to go, it’s becoming more of an expectation than a luxury.

Some experts predict that eventually, these apps will simply be seen as stepping stones along our technological journey. There are some that believe integrating our phone is just the first part, of an eventual landscape where it’ll be the norm to integrate and connect your vehicle with absolutely everything around it: other vehicles, infrastructure, and maybe even pedestrians and cyclists who carry safety devices.

So enjoy these apps while you can, because it looks like change it already on its way!

Why Your App Needs A Great Landing Page

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If you’re doing things right, you’re working on your minimum viable product before finalizing your brand new app’s design. You’re dying to take this thing to market, but you know that if you want to do things right (meaning waste as little money as possible and build a stellar product at the same time!) it means validating your idea with early adopters.

You want to create your product so that people can use it, test it, and validate your idea, but you want to put in as little money as possible to reach that point. You know your friends and family will try it out, but what about your actual target audience? How do you reach those people?

If you want to have a real shot at reaching those people, you’re going to want to ensure you have one super important thing: a rockin’ landing page you can drive traffic to.

Your MVP Needs A Landing Page

If you want early adopters, investors, and media contacts to know about your new app, you’re going to need to create a solid landing page. When your app finally launches, you will already have done the work to build an audience through this landing page.

In the early stages of creating that minimum viable product for users to test, you may only have designs and ideas. As you work towards getting that MVP ready to roll out, this landing page will start the testing and audience-building process before you even have the beta version ready. It’s part of your validation process, and will help set your app up for success when your big day comes.

How To Create A Landing Page For Your New App

The good news on this one is that today, building a landing page is insanely easy. Whether you use your existing website, Leadpages or Squarespace, there are plenty of cost-effective and user-friendly options for you. You’ll want to buy your domain, and then attach it to your page once it’s live.

Here are the elements your landing page needs to have:

Your value proposition You want to clearly articulate why your product is attractive to your ideal audience. What makes you special, and why are you better than the other guys? Tell the story of your brand and make an emotional connection with your audience.

A demo of your product (designs and images will do if this isn’t possible at this stage) You need to show users how your product will work. What will the user experience be like? Show people to the best of your ability how your app will work, and what it can do for them.

Your product’s core benefits and features Don’t itemize all 25 functions of your app here, but focus on the primary functions. What benefits will your users experience, based on the features? Try to keep this section as benefits-based as possible. People care the most about what’s in it for them.

CTA to register for the release announcement Lastly, you want to make sure you’re capturing the contact information of anyone who lands on your page. This is the only way to contact them when you’re ready to launch, so make this the first thing they see when they land on your page.

If possible, get your value prop, CTA, and the start of your demo above the fold. This way, people see the most important elements immediately without having to scroll down the page.

So remember - even though you might still be working on creating your MVP, you don’t need to wait to start the testing and validation process. With a great landing page, you can start testing the market and demand for what you’re building now and gain even more insight into what your potential customers want and need from your product.

When It Comes To App Design, Colors Matter

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If you’re a designer or even a business owner, you get how important colors are. Whether we’re talking branding or website design, every color you choose can have an impact on how you make people feel, and how people interact with your business.

If you’re building an app, it’s no different. The color schemes and accents you choose have the power to make or break your user experience, like it or not. Color schemes are at the center of quality design, and it’s a step you don’t want to skip or choose arbitrarily.

Colors have the power to make the difference between an incredible user experience or an already forgotten one. From the beginning, you want to carefully consider and select the overall color scheme you plan to use in the design of your app, in order to maximize its potential. Every element should be considered, and here’s why.

One university study concluded that 62% to 90% of our snap judgements are based on color alone. Those are some substantial percentage points, and this represents a major opportunity to have a serious impact on the success of your app - before it’s even out there. I mentioned above that you’ve got to consider every element, and that wasn’t an attempt to be over-dramatic. If you want people to download your app from the app store, what colour should your logo and icon be? Research points to blue.

How Do Colors Make People Feel?

I won’t dive into the history of color theory or the color wheel, because the most important thing to get here is that you need to consider how different colors make people FEEL. That’s how you can ensure you elicit feelings that align with your brand, and avoid causing unwanted sentiments.

To get started, there’s a few things you want to find out. Then, you’re ready to start researching and making some decisions.

What colors are your industry competitors using? What other colors could be associated with the problems you solve? What colors could potentially cause the opposite of what you’re trying to achieve?

Although there are countless opinions on this matter, and countless answers if you do a quick search on Google, here are the most commonly understood color emotions.

ORANGE: friendly, cheerful and confident RED: excitement, youthful and bold PURPLE: creative, imaginative and wise YELLOW: optimism, clarity and warmth GREEN: peaceful, growth and health BLUE: trust, dependable and strength BLACK/GREY/WHITE: balance, neutral and calm

If you think about your favorite brands, you can probably connect those exact feelings to your perception of them.

Once you understand your industry, category, and consumer preferences, you can start thinking about what color scheme is going to make sense for your app’s design.

There are plenty of tools out there to help you with your color scheme. From things like color wheels to softwares, you’ve got your pick. Research shows that people prefer just a few colors, which has led to huge popularity for the monochromatic colour scheme. This is the belief that it makes sense to choose one primary color, and then use its tones, shades, and tints to pull in complementary colors.

There are countless ways to choose the color scheme for your app, but the type of scheme you choose won’t be the most important. What’s essential here is that you start the design process of your app with a thorough understanding of your industry, and what the colors you choose make people feel.

Stop Trying To Use Your MVP As A Prototype For Your Final Product

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Minimum viable product is a term that has been used and abused, to the detriment of many startups.

Here’s the full definition, according to Google:

“A minimum viable product (MVP) is a development technique in which a new product or website is developed with sufficient features to satisfy early adopters. The final, complete set of features is only designed and developed after considering feedback from the product's initial users.”

The definition makes it pretty clear that the point of developing a minimum viable product is to conduct market research. You want to validate the idea by having people use it, provide feedback, and confirm there really is a demand for the product. Then, you want to use their feedback to finalize the end design and features, to ensure you’re building something that gives people exactly what they want.

But why are so many businesses missing the mark on this?

TRYING TO SAVE MONEY

Countless startups have attempted to use the MVP stage to save money, and jump ahead to building the prototype long before they’ve gotten any feedback from the actual users. They are hoping the prototype will serve as the foundation for the end product, which completely negates the point of creating the MVP in the first place.

FOCUSED ON MEETING DEADLINES

Some startups or managers are more concerned about meeting a launch date than creating a quality MVP. They skimp on good quality and design, just to get something in the hands of users to test. If the product people are presented with isn’t good enough for people to want it, again it’s a complete contradiction to this entire process. Quality and design really do matter at this stage, because that’s part of the feedback you want from end users as well.

FORGETTING THIS IS ABOUT BOTH MARKET RESEARCH AND PRODUCT FEATURES

Some managers get tunnel vision and forget there are many variables that need to be considered when creating a solid MVP that will be able to do its job. You can’t focus on just deadlines, features, or market research. You’ve got to remember there is an entire puzzle here, that should be satisfied through the development and delivery of your MVP. If you leave one piece out, you’re not getting the full benefits from your efforts.

How To Get The Most From Your MVP

Decide on a goal and focus for your MVP. This will help you to distinguish and prioritize the most important aspects of this particular product or application, and ensure everyone is on the same page. With a common goal, it’s easier to fit all the puzzle pieces around the center piece.

Here are 3 common types:

MVP-M: the main goal is to test the marketing and find out if there’s any demand for what you’re offering.

MVP-T: the focus here is a technical demonstration when you want to ensure your proof of concept will work the way you want it to, and you need to explore design options.

MVP-L: this option is for when only the most important features are prioritized. This can be either useful or an all out war when multiple stakeholders are involved, but can work if you’re able to decide on your “must haves” over a short period of time.

Many people out there feel like the MVP process is completely broken. We need to get back to basics, and remember why we’re doing this in the first place. It’s not to rush something to market, or to save on design costs. The point is to ensure that there’s a demand for your product, and find out what features and design elements matter most to the end users. Remember this, and you’ll be ahead of the pack.

Why Even Small Businesses Are Investing In Developing Apps

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Does your business have its own app, or are you dreaming of creating one? Whether you have the ability to develop it yourself, or need to hire someone, it’s a very complex and often costly endeavour. In theory, the idea of having your own app is great. You get consumers engaged in your own proprietary interface where you have complete control over their experience. The opportunities of what you can do within your own app are endless, plus it’s just cool in general.

There are also instances where you may want an app for internal use only, to help your employees manage things like workflow, projects, reservations, budgets, scheduling, and so on. For the sake of clarity, I’m focusing on mobile apps that are created for your customers, rather than your employees.

A recent survey by The Manifest of 350 small businesses showed that 47% of businesses with more than 50 employees already had an app, and that 37% of those businesses invested between $25k and $100k to have their app developed.

Why Businesses Might Want Their Own App

You’re visible to your customers constantly. How many times each day does someone unlock their phone and view their screen? Every time they do, they’re seeing you. Making your way onto someone’s smartphone is a huge accomplishment and massive branding and recognition opportunity. You can use it as your own direct marketing channel. You have the power to include anything you want in your app, so it’s a great place for sales, specials, etc. You don’t want to become spammy, but there’s an opportunity for permission-based marketing within your own app.

You can give your clients endless value through your own app. From customer loyalty programs to app-specific benefits, you can really make it worth their while. Customer retention is a struggle for all businesses, and your own app can be used as a tool to provide continuous value.

You can use it to provide excellent customer service and keep the line of communication open. Having your own chat or messenger — which allows customers to connect with someone immediately — is just one of the ways you can use your app to engage with customers. Long-term, this will increase customer loyalty and engagement.

You will appear significantly cooler and more established than your competitors. Let’s face it — companies who have their own apps appear legitimate, successful and current.

Questions To Ask Yourself Before Getting Started

If you’re seriously considering developing an app, there are some fundamental things you should consider first.

Why do you want one? What is the end goal? Do you want it to be for Android, iOS, or both? How much of an investment can you afford to make? Do you want to build it in-house, or hire a freelancer or contractor? What do you want the functionalities to be? What type of risk is involved? Will it be free, or paid?

If you can validate the cost of developing your own app, and have a clear purpose and goal in mind, it might be time to start seriously thinking about it. Pretty soon, you might in the minority of businesses who don’t have one.

Studies show that the average mobile user spends 85% of their usage time in apps, so it’s clear that’s today’s consumers prefer to use apps to carry out their daily activities. Having your business’s app on the smartphones of your customers would be a major win, wouldn’t it?